Album Reviews

Literature
Chorus

Oct 30, 2014 Web Exclusive

The word "jangly" seems to come up more often in indie pop reviews than anywhere else, but when it comes to a band like Literature and their new album Chorus, it's hard to think of a quicker way to sum up their sound.

The History of Apple Pie
Feel Something

Oct 29, 2014 Web Exclusive

The polite female vocals, the wispy shoegazing guitars, the sudden transition from oceanic sonics to more pop-based songwriting: it seems like The History of Apple Pie is posturing to be the next Lush.

jj
V

Oct 28, 2014 Web Exclusive

For a band whose name and album titles are minimal, JJ traffics in a sound far more expansive. Sure, the title track introducing the album is fairly small in scope, but it gives way to the rolling percussion and strings of "Dynasti" before you know it.

Classic Interviews

Jennifer Lawrence

Jennifer Lawrence
Interview with the star of Winter's Bone

Jun 25, 2010 Web Exclusive

In her most recent films, 19-year-old Jennifer Lawrence has portrayed resilient, mature-minded teens who, by default, have assumed the mother role in their respective families. In Winter's Bone, which won the Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic at the Sundance Film Festival in January, Lawrence plays Ree Dolly, an impoverished 17-year-old living in the Missouri Ozarks who is hellbent on keeping her preteen brother and sister out of the hands of unreliable surrogate parents. Though Lawrence is the youngest in her family, she admits that her maternal instincts are evident in real life. "I've always been a babysitter and a nanny," she says. "All my friends call me mom."

Comic Book Reviews

The Wraith: Welcome to Christmasland
IDW

Oct 29, 2014 Issue #51 - September/October 2014 - alt-J

Man, that Joe Hill has some creepy-ass ideas, and they lend themselves very well to Charles P. Wilson III's comic book visuals in this companion piece to Hill's novel NOS4A2.

Interviews

Daniel Radcliffe, Juno Temple, and author Joe Hill on ‘Horns’

Oct 30, 2014 Web Exclusive

In Horns, Daniel Radcliffe stars as Ig Perrish, a young man who finds himself accused of murdering his girlfriend—a crime he knows he didn’t commit, but lacks any proof to clear his name. Perceived as a villain in the public eye, Ig awakes to find he’s sprouted a pair of devilish horns, and possesses powers that compel others to tell him their darkest, most tucked-away secrets. With his new abilities, he sets out to prove his innocence by finding the person who took away the love of his life and bringing them to justice.

Director Tommy Wirkola on Nazi Zombies and ‘Dead Snow 2’

Oct 24, 2014 Web Exclusive

Writer/director Tommy Wirkola enjoys zombie movies, but has held a special affinity for movies that combine horror and gore since he was a child. The result was 2009’s Dead Snow, a horror/comedy film about a group of Norwegian skiers who do the unthinkable: reincarnate a regiment of Nazi zombies. The sequel—Dead Snow 2: Red vs. Dead—could have strictly been a continuation of a hilarious premise, but Wirkola has more tricks up his sleeve.

Pleased to meet you

My Favorite New Band: Generationals on Springtime Carnivore

Oct 03, 2014 Web Exclusive

Who better to give us all tips on new music than accomplished musicians themselves. For this series we have asked more established artists one simple request: tell us who your new favorite band is. For this My Favorite New Band Grant Widmer of the duo Generationals tells us about their tour mate/opening act, Springtime Carnivore (aka Greta Morgan).

Lists

Walking Dead Week: The Walking Dead’s 10 Most Shocking Moments

Oct 10, 2014

This week is Walking Dead Week on Under the Radar's website. Season five of the wildly popular and critically acclaimed post-apocalyptic zombie drama starts this Sunday, October 12, at 9 p.m. (8 p.m. Central) on AMC. In anticipation of the show's return, for this special theme week of coverage we have interviewed around 10 members of the show's current cast and will be posting one to two Walking Dead interviews every day this week. Also, here's a Walking Dead list.

As The Walking Dead's success is at least partly built upon its ability to provide a constant supply of shocking moments, narrowing down a list to only 10 entries is no simple task. You find yourself leaving off scenes such as The Governor biting off Merle Dixon's fingers or Michonne digging out The Governor's eye because they aren't quite shocking enough. That said, a truly shocking moment isn't just a scene that caused you a moment of temporary discomfort and repulsion but one that remained memorable because it represented an unexpected shift in the storyline, one that changed the trajectory of the show. Here are the 10 moments that remain burned into the memories of Walking Dead fans. By Matt Fink

Blog

Doctor Who - In The Forest Of The Night (Season 8, Episode 10) Recap/Analysis

Oct 28, 2014 By Cody Ray Shafer

For the most part, this whole season of Doctor Who has been marked by high points. After several weeks of episodes that so successfully raised the bar, I was unfairly critical of last week's "Flatline," which was actually quite good. I'm afraid of falling into the same trap with "In the Forest of the Night," and that by comparing it to good chunk of excellent episodes that preceded it I might be judging it too harshly. But I don't think that's the case.






Cinema Reviews

ABCs of Death 2

Oct 29, 2014 Web Exclusive

Coming quickly on the heels of its 2013 predecessor, ABCs of Death 2 maintains the same formula, but steps up its game in several ways.

DVD Reviews

Nightbreed: The Director’s Cut Blu-ray
Studio: Scream Factory

Oct 27, 2014 Web Exclusive

While Nightbreed still isn’t a great film—even in this new director’s cut—Scream Factory should be lauded for allowing Barker to finally release his favored version.

Television Reviews

Doctor Who - “In The Forest Of The Night” (Season 8 Episode 10) Recap/Analysis
BBC America

Oct 28, 2014 Web Exclusive

For the most part, this whole season of Doctor Who has been marked by high points. After several weeks of episodes that so successfully raised the bar, I was unfairly critical of last week's "Flatline," which was actually quite good. I'm afraid of falling into the same trap with "In the Forest of the Night," and that by comparing it to good chunk of excellent episodes that preceded it I might be judging it too harshly. But I don't think that's the case.